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20121226
20130103
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
rewrites the forecast in california. and meet the burrito boys, ben tracey introduces us to 17 -- seven teams who embody the spirit of the zone. >> they have nothing and we ask for so much, and they ask for so little. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> good evening. jim axelrod is off tonight. i'm rebecca jarvis. with just two days left, senate leaders are still struggling to put together a last minute bp deal ahead of monday's midnight deadline for the fiscal cliff. failure could kick the country back into a recession. wyatt andrews is on capitol hill. >> reporter: today the halls of the senate were almost empty, as proposals got traded in private and over the phone. senate minority leader much mcconnell tried to sound upbeat. going to get a deal today sir? >> hope. so. >> reporter: house speaker boehner came to the capitol but left without comment. issue number one in the talks is amending the bush era tax cuts, which if unchanged will expire and raise taxes on all americans. starting tuesday, the average tax hike will be three to 5% per person. >> let's ke
years later, it's now a major effort to help those that need it most. one burrito at a time. ben tracey has the story. >> reporter: it began with a lengthy christmas wish list. >> i asked for an iphone, mac book air and ipad, and an ipod. >> reporter: and a very frustrated dad. >> i went, this is too much and i didn't want to raise a spoiled child. >> reporter: michael johnson wanted to teach his 12-year-old son alex a lesson. >> i think at that age took everything for granted. kids don't think about having a house, having a car. having a bed. having clothes. having food. >> reporter: so johnson made a batch of breakfast bur re: tos, put them in the truck and took his son and his friend luke to see where the homeless live another streets of san diego. >> i was like scared because i thought they were all criminals and drunks and like addicted to drugs. >> reporter: but what they found was something different. >> they would all be like god bless you, and we're like god bless you too. >> reporter: the boys now a group of seven have been making burritos and taking them to the streets every
-fashioned black cabs. they are as much a part of the british capital as the big ben on the tower bridge. >> no wonder then there was a huge outcry when back in october the company making those calves filed for bankruptcy. what's worse, the london taxi company had to recall a large number of the calves once renowned for their reliability. -- a large number of the tabs -- cabs once renowned for their reliability. >> not all the caps on the streets of the traditional black cabs and more. martin has driven a taxi in london for 18 years. he would rather not give his last name because he is not sure if he is willing to remain faithful to the london taxi company. >> i really don't know, to be honest. i've got mixed feelings. >> martin loves his job, and he likes driving around london, but he is aware that things have not been going well with the london taxi company. he thinks the company must have bad management because it has been losing money for the last four years running. his own vehicle has not been as reliable as he could have hoped. at least once, it was recalled to the factory to corr
of sight. until some believe their own rhetoric -- read ben bernanke -- about moderation. but when the global minotaur was mortally wounded, it left the global economy in disarray. it has put the world in permanent crisis. the minotaur was slain by a brave warrior named theseus. its death ushered a new era of tragedy, history, philosophy. our very own global minotaur died as the victim of wall street bankers. what will its demise bring? should be hope for a new era in which wealth does not require poverty? will be develop a system where no longer will abstract power waned while others get stronger? the global minotaur will be remembered as a remarkable piece to whose rain created and destroyed the illusion that the global economy was stable. thank you. [applause] right. questions? i think i am going to moderate myself. ok, you have to line up. this is the way you do it here, isn't it? >> that is a brilliant vision of where we have been. can you elaborate a little bit more on where you see us going? >> very briefly, i think that we are in a state of sustained bewilderment. because,
cliff again. >> from your lips, right? we can only hope. thanks, ben. see you later. we are going out, and we are very close to a 300-point gain, the best gain for the market in about four or five years with the dow up 296 points as we head towards the second hour. got wilbur ross joining us and more members of congress as well. stay tuned. >>> nearly a 300-point day on the dow jones industrial average. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm kelly evans in for maria bartiromo. bill griffith joins us here in just a second. stocks are kicking off 2013 with one of the biggest rallies we've seen in some time. the biggest, in fact, since 2009. here's a quick look at how we're finishing the day on wall street, waiting for the settle to come through to see if we can hit the three handle on the dow jones industrial average, but we won't be far away from it, regardless. the nasdaq is adding about 88 points, the s&p 500 and, bill, the bottom line, up anywhere from 2.4% to 3% for these averages. >> i'm looking at the board here in the new york stock exchange, and it shows we're up 308 points right n
ben bernanke -- about moderation. but when the global minotaur was mortally wounded, it left the global economy in disarray. it has put the world in permanent crisis. the minotaur was slain by a brave warrior named theseus. its death ushered a new era of tragedy, history, philosophy. our very own global minotaur died as the victim of wall street bankers. what will its demise bring? should be hope for a new era in which wealth does not require poverty? will be develop a system where no longer will abstract power waned while others get stronger? the global minotaur will be remembered as a remarkable piece to whose rain created and destroyed the illusion that the global economy was stable. thank you. [applause] right. questions? i think i am going to moderate myself. ok, you have to line up. this is the way you do it here, isn't it? >> that is a brilliant vision of where we have been. can you elaborate a little bit more on where you see us going? >> very briefly, i think that we are in a state of sustained bewilderment. because, let's face it. in the 1930's, the new deal, despit
interviews with retiring members of congress. at 8:00 p.m. easter, senator ben nelson of nebraska talks about his two terms and his time as a member of the gang of six. then at 8:40, represented jerry lewis of california on his 17 terms in congress. that is followed at 9:15 with representative lynn woolsey on her anti-war work. that is thursday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, here on c-span. >> tonight, a discussion on corporations in pursuit of high stock values. then a group economist explains why he believes the u.s. is responsible for the global financial crisis. later, interviews with retiring members of congress. on tomorrow morning's washington journal, we are asking business owners to call in and talk about the fiscal cliff and their plans for next year. then we will continue with the forecast for the coming years housing market. that is all about more discussion of the fiscal cliff negotiations as congress returns to washington. we will be joined by steve forbes. later, discussion on background checks, how they work, who gets them, and when they are required. our guest is matt bennett. "washin
this week and there were a few issues raised by support. number one is the religion has totally for ben for gay people to get married. second of all we have others who did mention earlier about equal opportunity that every person has the right to get married regardless of whether they are male or female. the last plane like to make it say what this young person who can say to to me they shouldn't have been voted for the make your mark ballot. instead it should have been young people and the police, which is by far more important. thank you. [applause] >> and i'm not just to say because they see a small number of people standing up who have spoken before and i welcome your csm, but in fairness to people who haven't had a chance to speak, i need to be looking for those who have not spoken before the debate. the woman in the back row. yes, it is you. >> i am representing. it is love, care and dedication between two people. if those two people know they love each other, is it unfair to say they need to have it written on paper and writing on paper for his love more important. there are othe
recently had with nebraska democratic senator ben nelson. he served two terms and was part of the so-called gang of 14. that is at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. here is a brief look. >> what is your thought about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another. i think the word compromise is over used, underutilized and misunderstood by an awful lot of people
seats which is how the following happened. amen named ben davis, benjamin davis won s c and city council of new york in the 1940s. you might be interested in two aspect of benjamin davis, city council member. he was black. he was an african-american and he was an enthusiastic public leader of the united states communist party and he was elected because of proportional representation. shortly after that proportional representation was ended. new democracy came in first, they had twenty-eight%. ari arizahad 24 or something close. under greek law whatever party comes in first gets not only the percentage of the popular vote that is won but an extra 50. that is the only reason there the government in greece now because they got it by this rule which is designed to favor the party that comes in first. you had a knife edge situation in greece. in addition to the sariza party their deep rooted greek communist party that got 8% of the vote typically so you have 24, one third of the voters in greece voted extreme left wing hostility not just to this crisis but to the capitalist system of greece
. welcome, ben bernanke. like dan the man and myself, we're going to be looking at that participation rate. i don't think ben's going to want the lower rate to be driven by issues that are economically sound. >> i think you're right. the one thing you have to pay attention to, what if we start stronger numbers. >> i hope unemployment goes down, participation rate goes up. now, i'm going to hit in another arena. i love simon and simon was given one of the republicans a hard time. and i understand that. hey, where was the entitlement reform? where was the media asking about it last night? >> we hadn't heard anything. >> these fiscal conservatives, maybe they're not as good as the president. they are the best. at playing political chess. >> yes, they are. >> it just unfortunate there's very little correlation between winning the chess game of politics and winning what's best for the country. >> you win a battle here, but what about the long-term war here? >> they're not winning anything right now. i'm so disgusted right now. it's what's been going on in our country for the past four years. th
cliff. this fall is really going to hurt. ben white of morning money, dennis, said an excuse to get a bic can keeney on the cover. >> relatively slow news day. what geithner did yesterday is almost as if he is strapping a damsel in distress to the tracks and saying the stakes are rising higher. the markets are taking all this tension, all this sort of -- these things at stake to really make the point perhaps that you have to have those stakes really high for people actually to get a deal. >> on "fast" last night when that letter crossed in the green rooms, we were chatting, we said this sounds like a ploy on the part of the treasury to actually get people to start moving. obviously, there wasn't a market selloff, did have the stumbling blocks and traders on friday said almost better if we did see the markets pull back more to crystallize what this could mean for the u.s. economy to members of congress. we didn't see that. it is a numbers game though in terms of what will happen. we know need 60 votes to clear a fill buster in the senate. seven republicans need to go along a lot of j
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)